About Us

We believe that there is a significant opportunity to help improve mental health and well being for millions of people globally.

The world is falling in love with the promise of psilocybin and it’s easy to understand why.

After a long period of prohibition, the FDA has granted psilocybin “breakthrough” status for the treatment of mental disorders. Distinguished medical institutions, ranging from John Hopkins University to the New York University’s Langone Medical Center and Imperial College in London, have produced research that has been widely published and even more widely hailed.

The interest and momentum are well founded. The current COVID-19 crisis reveals significant disparities between mental health needs and mental health resources. Yet, there is evidence-based science that tells us that psilocybin can make a difference. Peer reviewed clinical studies have determined that psilocybin reduces the symptoms of psychological trauma, PTSD, depression, anxiety, stress and addiction.

The world is falling in love with the promise of psilocybin and it’s easy to understand why.

After a long period of prohibition, the FDA has granted psilocybin “breakthrough” status for the treatment of mental disorders. Distinguished medical institutions, ranging from John Hopkins University to the New York University’s Langone Medical Center and Imperial College in London, have produced research that has been widely published and even more widely hailed.

The interest and momentum are well founded. The current COVID-19 crisis reveals significant disparities between mental health needs and mental health resources. Yet, there is evidence-based science that tells us that psilocybin can make a difference. Peer reviewed clinical studies have determined that psilocybin reduces the symptoms of psychological trauma, PTSD, depression, anxiety, stress and addiction.

Why natural psilocybin?

Guided by science and informed by nature, Psyence is focused on developing natural psilocybin products for the treatment of psychological trauma and mental health disorders. Our natural psychedelics are cultivated in Lesotho, the remote nation dubbed “The Kingdom of the Sky” by The Atlantic magazine, where pristine air and pure water nourish a harvest hand-tended by a team that includes mycologists and microbiologists.

Increasingly, conscious consumers seek nature-based solutions for medical health and wellness needs and shun synthetic products whenever possible. Psyence’s scientific research and development team is working to make available the psilocybin mushroom’s rich pharmacopeia of unique elements and create breakthrough synergies. Our scientific experts are cracking this code to write a new chapter in the history of medicine for mental wellness.

Psychedelic Revolution

Psilocybin has dominated the news cycle from the Wall Street Journal to the Financial Times. Public opinion has shifted attitudes toward psychedelics and healing; patients, families, and physicians are demanding new solutions. Governments and regulators are listening and so is the Psyence Group. We are working towards providing safe, legal psilocybin-based solutions.

Breaking new ground, Psyence established one of the first legal and federally licensed commercial natural psilocybin cultivation and production facilities in the world in 2020, in the Kingdom of Lesotho.

Psychedelic Revolution

Psilocybin has dominated the news cycle from the Wall Street Journal to the Financial Times. Public opinion has shifted attitudes toward psychedelics and healing; patients, families, and physicians are demanding new solutions. Governments and regulators are listening and so is the Psyence Group. We are working towards providing safe, legal psilocybin-based solutions.

Breaking new ground, Psyence established one of the first legal and federally licensed commercial natural psilocybin cultivation and production facilities in the world in 2020, in the Kingdom of Lesotho.

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Following up on their landmark 2016 study in 2020, researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine found that:

“A one-time, single-dose treatment of psilocybin, a compound found in psychedelic mushrooms, combined with psychotherapy appears to be associated with significant improvements in emotional and existential distress in cancer patients. These effects persisted nearly five years after the drug was administered.”
– Researchers, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, 2020

Psyence is focused on psilocybin for the treatment of psychological trauma in the context of palliative care

Palliative care is the treatment and alleviation of suffering for those facing an acute or persistent medical issue whether the prognosis is deemed terminal or long haul chronic.

Nearly 40% of palliative care patients are prescribed legacy antidepressant medication and two thirds are currently prescribed a sedative, such as benzodiazepine. These medications  have significant side effects, which can diminish the essential quality of these valuable and cherished last stages of life. Furthermore, the eye-opening study analysing the effect of antidepressants revealed that a mere 18% of the response is due to the drugs pharmacological effects; 82% was attributed to the placebo effect (Irving Kirsh, Z Psychol. 2014; 222: 128–134).

 

Psyence is focused on psilocybin for the treatment of psychological trauma in the context of palliative care

Palliative care is the treatment and alleviation of suffering for those facing an acute or persistent medical issue whether the prognosis is deemed terminal or long haul chronic.

Nearly 40% of palliative care patients are prescribed legacy antidepressant medication and two thirds are currently prescribed a sedative, such as benzodiazepine. These medications  have significant side effects, which can diminish the essential quality of these valuable and cherished last stages of life. Furthermore, the eye-opening study analysing the effect of antidepressants revealed that a mere 18% of the response is due to the drugs pharmacological effects; 82% was attributed to the placebo effect (Irving Kirsh, Z Psychol. 2014; 222: 128–134).